Last edited by Feran
Saturday, July 18, 2020 | History

2 edition of Child emotional security and interparental conflict found in the catalog.

Child emotional security and interparental conflict

Patrick T. Davies

Child emotional security and interparental conflict

by Patrick T. Davies

  • 247 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by Blackwell Publishers in Malden, MA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Security (Psychology) in children.,
  • Parental influences.,
  • Parent and child.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    StatementPatrick T. Davies, Gordon T. Harold, Marcie C. Goeke-Morey, E. Mark Cummings ; in collaboration with Katherine Shelton and Jennifer A. Rasi; with commentary by Jennifer M. Jenkins.
    SeriesMonographs of the Society for Research in Child Development -- serial no. 270, vol. 67, no. 3, 2000, Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development -- v. 67, no. 3.
    ContributionsHarold, Gordon T., Goeke-Morey, Marcie C., Cummings, E. Mark., Shelton, Katherine., Rasi, Jennifer A., Jenkins, Jennifer M., Society for Research in Child Development.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 131 p. ;
    Number of Pages131
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22372522M

      Emotional security is the sense of safety and security children feel in their family as a function of the stability in the interparental relationship (Cummings and Davies, ).It is parallel to, shares many similar risk factors, and correlates with attachment security, but each is a distinct construct. I. New Directions in the Study of Children and Marital Conflict 1. Marital Conflict and Risky Families 2. The Emergence of Process-Oriented Approaches: Emotional Security Theory II. Child Effects of Exposure to Marital Conflict 3. Identifying Constructive and Destructive Marital Conflict : $

      We examined parent–child attachment security as a mechanism that may account for the impact of interparental conflict on children's long-term risk of internalizing problems. Sixty-two community mothers, fathers, and children were followed from ages 2 to Silvia López-Larrosa, Vanesa Sánchez-Souto, Anh P. Ha, E. Mark Cummings, Emotional Security and Interparental Conflict: Responses of Adolescents from Different Living Arrangements, Journal of Child and Family Studies, /s, ().

    In a 3-wave longitudinal study, the authors tested hypotheses regarding children’s influence on the marital relationship, examining relations between interparental discord and children’s negative emotional reactivity, agentic behavior, dysregulated behavior, and psychosocial adjustment. Participants were cohabiting mothers and fathers who completed questionnaires and a marital conflict. Emotional security theory (EST) has illustrated the significance of children’s reactions to interparental conflict as a mediator of the relationships between exposure to interparental conflict and children’s later psychological and physiological well-being [1, 2, 3].Although empirical support has been well documented for older children [], less is known about younger children, specifically.


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Child emotional security and interparental conflict by Patrick T. Davies Download PDF EPUB FB2

This Monograph tests a theory proposing that high levels of conflict between parents leads to an increased child risk for mental health difficulties by shaking the child's sense of security in the family.

Signs of child insecurity in face of interparental conflict are reflected in: a.) greater fear and distress, b.) prolonged attempts to become involved in or avoid parental conflicts, and c Cited by:   Description Child Emotional Security and Interparental Conflict tests a theory proposing that high levels of conflict between parents leads to an increased child risk for mental health difficulties by shaking the childa s sense of security in the family/5(3).

Child Emotional Security and Interparental Conflict: Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development Paperback – Janu by Glyn : Glyn Ed. Davies. Introduction and literature review--ch.

2 Study 1: Child responses to interparental conflict: comparing the relative roles of emotional security and social learning processes --ch. Study 2: Relations between interparental conflict, child emotional security, and adjustment in the context of cognitive appraisals --ch.

Child emotional security and interparental conflict Author: Gordon T Harold ; E Mark Cummings ; Marcie C Goeke-Morey ; Patrick T Davies ; Society for Research in Child Development. Author information Child Emotional Security and Interparental Conflict tests a theory proposing that high levels of conflict between parents leads to an increased child risk for mental health difficulties by shaking the child's sense of security in the family.

Child Emotional Security and Interparental Conflict Patrick T. Davies (Editor), Gordon T. Harold (Editor), Marcie C. Goeke-Morey (Editor), E. Mark Cummings (Editor), Jennifer M. Jenkins (Commentaries by), Willis F. Overton (Series Editor).

A path model depiction of the results from Davies et al. () testing the mediational role of child security in family relationships in the link between interparental conflict and parenting.

This finding provides support for an emotional security theory (Davies & Cummings, ) that posits that conflict undermines security about not only the interparental relationship but also the parent–child relationship, with implications for multiple family relationships.

To the extent that children are exposed to greater maladaptive conflict and negativity following conflict, their emotional security.

Child Emotional Security and Interparental Conflict tests a theory proposing that high levels of conflict between parents leads to an increased child risk for mental health difficulties by shaking the child's sense of security in the family.

This insecurity was associated with greater mental health difficulties, even when considering the role of prior mental health, child perceptions of parental conflict, and parent-child relations. INTERPARENTAL CONFLICT, TODDLER EMOTIONAL SECURITY, PARENTAL EMOTION SOCIALIZATION, AND TODDLER SOCIO-EMOTIONAL OUTCOMES: TESTING DYADIC DYNAMICS USING ACTOR-PARTNER INTERDEPENDENCE MODELS By Young-Eun Lee A DISSERTATION Submitted to Michigan State University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of.

E. Mark Cummings, Melissa R. George, Kathleen P. McCoy and Patrick T. Davies, Interparental Conflict in Kindergarten and Adolescent Adjustment: Prospective Investigation of Emotional Security as an Explanatory Mechanism, Child Development, 83, 5, (), ().

Abstract In response to the societal premium placed on understanding the difficulties faced by children from high-conflict homes, emotional security theory aims to understand precisely how and why interparental discord is associated with children's psychological problems. In two subsequent conceptualizations of the processes linking marital conflict and children's behavioral adjustment, Crockenberg and Forgays (; ), in their specific emotions model, and Davies and Cummings (; ), in their emotional security model, elaborated Grych and Fincham's () framework, giving emotion a more pivotal explanatory role.

Children's Emotional Security in the Interparental Relationship In response to the societal premium placed on understanding the difficulties faced by children from high-conflict homes, emotional security theory aims to understand precisely how and why interparental discord is associated with children's psychological problems.

The Emotional Security Hypothesis (Davies & Cummings, ) posits that children’s reactions to IPC are a function of the perceived implications of the conflict on the well-being of the family and have the goal of preserving and promoting the child’s own emotional security.

Thus, cognitions associated with threatened family security are likely to elicit fear and helplessness. We examined parent-child attachment security as a mechanism that may account for the impact of interparental conflict on children's long-term risk of internalizing problems.

Sixty-two community mothers, fathers, and children were followed from ages 2 to Parents reported on their conflicts when their children were 2. Emotional security theory was introduced over two decades ago to explain how and why children exposed to interparental and family conflict are at greater risk for developing psychopathology.

Using developmental psychopathology as an evaluative lens, this chapter provides a review of the progress, challenges, and future directions in testing EST.

Guided by the emotional security hypothesis, this study reports on the development of a new self‐report measure that assesses children’s strategies for preserving emotional security in the context of interparental conflict.

Participants were sixth, seventh, and eighth graders and a subset of their mothers, fathers, and teachers. Four studies tested a theory that high interparental conflict increases child mental health risk by shaking children's sense of security in the family. Findings showed that children's fear, avoidance, and involvement were prominent responses, especially relative to reactions predicted by other theories.

Interparental conflict related to greater child by:. Interparental conflict (IPC) is linked with adolescents’ heightened emotional insecurity about family relations.

Our aim was to examine Spanish adolescents’ differential responses to IPC as a function of specific dimensions of IPC and emotional security, in two different living arrangements. Participants were adolescents (M age = years), comprising a community sample of   Rebecca Y.

M. Cheung, E. Mark Cummings, Zhiyong Zhang, Patrick T. Davies, Trivariate Modeling of Interparental Conflict and Adolescent Emotional Security: An Examination of Mother–Father–Child Dynamics, Journal of Youth and Adolescence, /sx, 45, 11, (), ().and internalizing symptoms) and children’s responses to interparental conflict (i.e., emotional, behav- undermine children’s security and elicit greater efforts to regulate.